16 July 2007

"A WEB OF WHITE LIES"

By R. B. STUART


The State officials are slowly beginning to take the toxic effects of depleted Uranium on our military men and woman serious. As they are no longer waiting for Washington and the DoD to admit there’s a severe health concern amoungst soldiers exposed to DU while on tour. A dozen States thus far have stepped up to do what’s right in acknowledging the ill effects of DU inhalation or ingestion. As the White House is in their own fantasy land about this War in Iraq, they continue to bank on the American people sitting lethargically on the couch watching some blonde get railroaded by the system, whether Paris Hilton or Anna Nicole….their concerns are right here. Not a million miles away in Iraq.

And so we sift through the 5th year of war in the sandbox, while soldiers are slipping through our hands, ending up on the steps of the VA in a wasteland of paperwork---confused, helpless wounded and abused. They deployed as courageous soldiers crisply donning the American flag, only to return wrinkled and invisible, or draped in a red, white and blue cloth. The soldiers soaked with toxins, ravaged with cancer, exploded heads, legs or arms with shredded psyches and raped of their innocent heart.

Below are some writers and publications that have been there from the beginning weaving the web of facts and truth about the war, and are making a difference. ### RBS

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Approved May 10, 2007 - The Committee of New Hampsiire State-Federal Relations and Veterans Affairs concurrent resolution urges the Department of Veterans Affairs and the adjutant general to provide health screening for depleted Uranium exposure for certain NH members and Veterans of the Armed Forces and National Guard and their dependents. To read further. See below.

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE

A Resolution urging that New Hampshire members and Veterans of the Armed Forces and National Guard and their dependents receive health screening for depleted Uranium exposure

Whereas, the World Health Organization has released several reports and scientific studies concerning the health risks from exposure to depleted Uranium; and whereas, the chemical and radiological toxicity of depleted Uranium has been a reported cause of kidney dysfunction, damage to lung cells that increases the possibility of lung cancer, neurological disorders, liver infection, and high miscarriage rates among military personnel who have returned from a designated combat zone where depleted uranium munitions have been used; and

Whereas, these munitions and armor have been used extensively in the 1991 Gulf War and during the 3 years since the 2003 invasion of Iraq; and

Whereas, the significant environmental impact from military use and disposal of depleted Uranium munitions has been found in contaminated ground surfaces, which over time will lead to food and ground water contamination; and

Whereas, Connecticut and Louisiana have recently passed legislation, and many other states are considering legislation, to give all returning veterans the right to a best practices health screening test for exposure to depleted Uranium; and

Whereas, reliable reports indicate widespread military non-compliance with regulations, orders, and directives, including Medical Management of Unusual Depleted Uranium Casualties, dated October 14, 1993; Medical Management of Army Personnel Exposed to depleted Uranium, dated April 20, 2004; and section 2-5 of Army Regulations 700-48, requiring prompt medical care for all exposed individuals; and

Whereas, there is a public health need to ensure the safe storage, disposal, and clean-up of munitions and other products containing depleted uranium; now, therefore, be it Resolved by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring:

That the New Hampshire legislature urges the Department of Veterans Affairs to assist any member of the armed forces or veteran of the armed services who has been exposed to depleted Uranium munitions or equipment, and the dependants of any such member or veteran, to obtain a best practices health screening test for exposure to depleted Uranium that uses methods capable of detecting low levels of depleted Uranium; and That the NH legislature urges the adjutant general to:

(1) Assist any member of the New Hampshire National Guard who has handled, used, or stored depleted Uranium munitions or equipment and any member who returns or has returned to this State after service in an area designated by the President of the United States, and any such member’s dependents, to obtain a best practices health screening test for exposure to depleted Uranium that uses methods capable of detecting low levels of depleted Uranium; and

(2) Ensure that quality health treatment is available for all members or veterans of the New Hampshire National Guard and their dependents who may have been exposed to depleted Uranium; and That copies of this resolution be transmitted to the United States Secretary of Defense, the adjutant general, the commissioner of the department of health and human services, and the members of the New Hampshire congressional delegation.
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The VA handled 774,000 claims last year but received 806,382. The number of veterans receiving disability benefits has climbed from about 2.3 million in 2000 to 2.7 million in 2006.
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April 2007: Tribune Media Services - THWARTED WARRIOR
Robert C. Koehler ---


According to Veterans Administration figures from last August, 205,000 GIs who have returned from Iraq and Afghanistan, a third of the total, have sought medical care, for such problems as malignant tumors (1,584), endocrinal and metabolic diseases (36,409), nervous system diseases (61,524), digestive system diseases (63,002), musculoskeletal diseases (87,590), and mental disorders (73,157), among many other conditions. One of the largest categories is “ill defined,” a.k.a. mystery conditions (67,743). In comparison, a relatively small number (35,765) have sought VA care for injuries. _________________________________________________

Depleted Uranium Death Toll Tops 11,000Nationwide Media Blackout Keeps U.S. Public Ignorant About This Important Story
James P. Tucker Jr.---


The death toll from the highly toxic weapons component known as depletedUranium (DU) has reached 11,000 soldiers and the growing scandal may be the reason behind Anthony Principi's departure as secretary of the VeteransAffairs Department. This view was expressed by Arthur Bernklau, executive director of Veterans for Constitutional Law in New York, writing in Preventive Psychiatry E-Newsletter.

"The real reason for Mr. Principi's departure was really never given," Bernklau said. "However, a special report published by eminent scientist Leuren Moret naming depleted uranium as the definitive cause of 'Gulf War Syndrome' has fed a growing scandal about the continued use of uraniummunitions by the U.S. military."

”The "malady [from DU] that thousands of our military have suffered and died from has finally been identified as the cause of this sickness, eliminating the guessing. . . . The terrible truth is now being revealed," Bernklau said.

Of the 580,400 soldiers who served in Gulf War I, 11,000 are now dead, he said. By the year 2000, there were 325,000 on permanent medical disability. More than a decade later, more than half (56 percent) who served in Gulf War I have permanent medical problems. The disability rate for veterans of the world wars of the last century was 5 percent, rising to 10 percent in Vietnam.

"The VA secretary was aware of this fact as far back as 2000," Bernklau said. "He and the Bush administration have been hiding these facts, but now, thanks to Moret's report, it is far too big to hide or to cover up."Terry Johnson, public affairs specialist at the VA, recently reported that veterans of both Persian Gulf wars now on disability total 518,739, Bernklau said.

"The long-term effect of DU is a virtual death sentence," Bernklau said. "Marion Fulk, a nuclear chemist, who retired from the Lawrence Livermore Nuclear Weapons Lab, and was also involved in the Manhattan Project, interprets the new and rapid malignancies in the soldiers [from the second war] as 'spectacular'--and a matter of concern.' "
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April 14, 2007: Canada Lets Iraqi Doctor Speak – They Offer Forum for Lecturer Barred from the U.S.
Jonathan Woodward ---


A highly regarded Iraqi epidemiologist who wants to tell Americans about an alarming rise in cancer levels among Iraqi children will come to Canada instead because he couldn't get a visa to the United States. Unable to travel to the University of Washington, Riyadh Lafta – best known for a controversial study that estimated Iraq's body count inthe U.S.-led war in Iraq at more than half a million -- will arrive at Simon Fraser University in B.C. this month to give a lecture and meet with research associates.

"The University of Washington wanted him, but the U.S. denied his entry," said his colleague at SFU, Tim Takaro. "They need to be able to collaborate, even if his results are unpopular with the Americans. Now he's at SFU, and the best they're going to get is a video feed."Once in Canada, Dr. Lafta will present estimates that paint a damning portrait of the war's ravages on children: that birth defects are on the rise since the war began, and that the number of children dying from cancers such as leukemia has risen tenfold.

Dr. Lafta had tried for six months to get a visa into Seattle to speak in Washington, and was ignored a half-dozen times, Dr. Takaro said.

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services couldn't be reached for comment. But a spokesman for Seattle Democratic Congressman Jim McDermott said he couldn't understand the decision. "Jim's certainly more than a little unhappy about it. We don't know whether this was a snafu or more than that," Mike DeCesare said. "Certainly with the doctor not able to be on the campus, and engage directly with people, you've got to believe that's a net loss for everybody."

Dr. Lafta was born in Baghdad in 1960, was trained as a physician at Baghdad University College and then worked for 14 years for the Ministry of Health under Saddam Hussein. He became the head of the communicable disease department and then the primary-care department of Diyala province in northern Iraq.

Dr. Lafta, who is still in Iraq, couldn't be reached by e-mail yesterday. But Dr. Takaro shared a message from his personal communication. "The main point is that people outside Iraq do not realize the real disaster we are suffering," Dr. Lafta writes. "Onlythe Iraqi people know that, simply because the foreigners are listening to the news while we are living the events on the ground."
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Februray 23, 2005: Heads Roll at Veterans Administration Mushrooming Depleted Uranium (DU) Scandal Blamed
Bob Nichols ---

Considering the tons of depleted Uranium used by the U.S., the Iraq war can truly be called a nuclear war. Preventive Psychiatry E-Newsletter charged Monday that the reason Veterans Affairs Secretary Anthony Principi stepped down earlier this month was the growing scandal surrounding the use of uranium munitions in the Iraq War.

Writing in Preventive Psychiatry E-Newsletter No. 169, Arthur N. Bernklau, executive director of Veterans for Constitutional Law in New York, stated, "The real reason for Mr. Principi's departure was really never given, however a special report published by eminent scientist Leuren Moret naming depleted Uranium as the definitive cause of the 'Gulf War Syndrome' has fed a growing scandal about the continued use of uranium munitions by the US Military."

Bernklau continued, "This malady (from uranium munitions), that thousands of our military have suffered and died from, has finally been identified as the cause of this sickness, eliminating the guessing. The terrible truth is now being revealed."He added, "Out of the 580,400 soldiers who served in GW1 (the first Gulf War), of them, 11,000 are now dead! By the year 2000, there were 325,000 on Permanent Medical Disability. This astounding number of 'Disabled Vets' means that a decade later, 56% of those soldiers who served have some form of permanent medical problems!" The disability rate for the wars of the last century was 5 percent; it was higher, 10 percent, in Vietnam.

"The VA Secretary (Principi) was aware of this fact as far back as 2000," wrote Bernklau. "He, and the Bush administration have been hiding these facts, but now, thanks to Moret's report, (it) ... is far too big to hide or to cover up!"

Terry Jamison, Public Affairs Specialist, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs, Department of Veterans Affairs, at the VA Central Office, recently reported that 'Gulf Era Veterans' now on medical disability, since 1991, number 518,739 Veterans," said Berklau.

“The long-term effects have revealed that DU (uranium oxide) is a virtual death sentence," stated Berklau. "Marion Fulk, a nuclear physical chemist, who retired from the Lawrence Livermore Nuclear Weapons Lab, and was also involved with the Manhattan Project, interprets the new and rapid malignancies in the soldiers (from the 2003 Iraq War) as 'spectacular’ and a matter of concern!'"When asked if the main purpose of using DU was for ‘destroying things and killing people,’ Fulk was more specific: "I would say it is the perfect weapon for killing lots of people!"

Principi could not be reached for comment prior to deadline.
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April 2, 2007: Delaware State News - 1.5 Million Soldiers Vaccinated Since 1998 Anthrax Shot Returns to Base
Kate House-Layton ---

Dover Air Force Base is again vaccinating its members for anthrax.The military-wide mandatory immunization program started March 19 2007 at Dover after a three-year hiatus due to federal questions about the vaccine’s effectiveness. All “uniformed personnel, emergency-essential and equivalent civilian employees” who are assigned for at least 15 consecutive days to the Middle East, East Africa and Central Asia or U.S. Forces in Korea are required to take the shot, U.S. Department of Defense spokeswoman Cynthia Smith said.

Those assigned to “special units with biowarfare, or bioterrorism, related missions and other specially designated units,” also are required to take the shots, Ms. Smith said.The latest round of shots troubles retired Dover Air Force Base Lt. Col. Jay Lacklen. The Dover resident, who was in charge of the 326th Airlift Squadron in 1999, hasn’t forgotten the health problems he and fellow airmen at the Dover base suffered when the shots were given in the late 1990s or how 55 out of the 120 reserve pilots he supervised left his unit at the Dover base to avoid the shots.“I don’t know how many will leave to avoid the shot this time,” he said.

The U.S. Department of Defense announced its plan in October to bring back the shot program military wide. In February, the assistant secretary of defense for health affairs approved service implementation plans, the military’s Anthrax Vaccination Information Program Web site said. The vaccine is given in a six-shot series over an 18-month period. The first three shots are administered within two weeks of each other, then two more after a couple of months and a yearly booster.

Dover Air Force Base spokeswoman Lt. Christine Sukach said the base could not say how many vaccines have been given locally since the program returned because it is a readiness indicator for airmen deployed in high threat areas. The DOD, however, has vaccinated more than 1.5 million people worldwide with more than 5.7 million vaccine doses since 1998, she said.DOD’s vaccination program started in 1998. The shots stopped in 2004 after several service members filed a suit in the U.S. District Court of Washington and a federal judge placed an injunction against the anthrax vaccination program. The judge ruled that the FDA made mistakes in its decision about the vaccine’s effectiveness against anthrax inhalation. The FDA then declared it safe for inhalation anthrax in 2005. The Pentagon has repeatedly said the vaccine was approved by the Food and Drug Administration and it was proven safe and effective.

The vaccine itself doesn’t concern Lt. Col. Lacklen. His biggest concern is whether the latest round of shots contain squalene, an agent that he said was added to the vaccine to boost its effectiveness in the ’90s. Studies, he said, point to squalene as the source of various autoimmune disorders, which includes muscle and joint pain, heart and breathing problems among other things.The squalene, he said, was in five of the first 50 lot numbers in 1999. The military, he said, refuses to test for it. He also said the product insert that accompanies every vaccine package lists a string of autoimmune disorders that occur coincidentally with the shots. The military does not talk about the product insert, he said.

Ms. Smith said it is a myth that the military added squalene to the anthrax vaccine. “Food and Drug Administration scientists found trace quantities of squalene in anthrax, diphtheria and tetanus vaccines — less than the natural level of squalene in the human bloodstream. The FDA notes that these minute quantities could have come from processing during FDA tests. Squalene is present in the oil in fingerprints.”Lt. Col. Lacklen disagrees with this explanation. “Is it still contaminated?” he asked. “Are they testing to see if its still contaminated?”

The AVIP Web site also said the squalene present in anthrax vaccine probably comes from the bacteria used to make the vaccine.Lt. Col. Lacklen said according to a Tulane University study, there is no squalene in anthrax bacteria. DOD also has said anthrax is still used as a bioweapon against U.S. soldiers which makes the vaccine necessary.Lt. Col. Lacklen disagrees. “There’s been no anthrax threat evident overseas,” Lt. Col. Lacklen said. “The issue is (the military is) conducting a surreptitious experiment on the troops by using the illegal additive that boosts the effect of the vaccine. They can’t explain how the booster got in there in 1999 and they can’t explain if it is still in there now. And that is the cause for concern.”“They can’t answer the questions. Yet even though they can’t answer the questions they’re still going to order their people to take the shot and I find that unconscionable.”

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